ADDENDA - Final Milestone Report Joint SO/AC

                  New gTLD Applicant Support Working Group (WG)

 

  1. Members, Affiliations, Statements of Interest, Attendance.............................................2
  2. Summary and Analysis - Snapshot Public Comments Received from June 16 to August 23         .............................................................................................................................14
  3. Blog posting Call for Input: Support for New gTLD Applicants ” June 14........................27
  4. Text of Initial Snapshot Released on 16 June 2010..........................................................29
  5. Transcript - Brussels Meeting Workshop Session
  6. Cover letter and text Excerpt from Draft Final Report -­ New gTLD Applicant Support (JAS WG) taken on 18 September 2010



1.    Members, Affiliations, Statements of Interest, Attendance

 

1.1    Members and Respective Affiliations

Below is a list of members of this WG. This WG also had the support of ICANN Staff, specifically: Karla Valente, Gisella Grubber-White, Glen de Saint Géry, Olof Nordling.

 

Name

Affiliation

Carlos Dionisio Aguirre

ALAC

Sébastien Bachollet

ALAC

Tijani Ben Jemaa

At Large

Fabien Betremieux

Individual; AFNIC

Eric Brunner-Williams

Individual

Olga Cavalli

NomCom Appointee

Rafik Dammak

NCSG

Avri Doria

NCS;  co-chair

William Drake

NCSG

Alex Gakuru

NCSG

Dr. Govind

GAC

Alan Greenberg

ALAC

Anthony Harris

ISCPC

Dave Kissoondoyal

At Large

Cheryl Langdon Orr

ALAC

Evan Leibovitch

ALAC; co-chair

Andrew Mack

CBUC

Michele Neylon

RrSG

Elaine Pruis

Individual

Vanda Scartezini

Individual

Baudouin Schombe

AFRALO; At Large

Alioune Traore

Individual

Richard Tindal

Individual

 

1.2 Statements of Interest (SOIs)

The SOIs below can also be found at: http://gnso.icann.org/issues/jas/soi-jas-wg-27may10-en.htm.

 

Individuals & Affiliations

SOIs

 

Carlos Dionisio Aguirre

ALAC

1. Current vocation, employer and position

a. LAWYER - Specialist in Business Rights; b. PROFESSOR of ECONOMY &
PROFESSOR of LAW, ECONOMY & BUSINESS in the INFORMATION SOCIETY (UNC - National University of Cordoba - Argentina)

2. Type of work performed in 1 above

a. Owner of his law firm; b. Academical specially.

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement

none

4. Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes. Are you representing other parties?

I have no commercial interests in ICANN activities.

5. Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member

I'm current re-elected ALAC member.

6. Geographic Region associated with the nationality of volunteer (Africa, North America, Latin America/Caribbean, Asia/Australia/Pacific and Europe)

LAC region

7. Stakeholder Group(s) in which volunteer currently participates within the ICANN organization

Non Commercial End Users - ALAC

Eric Brunner-Williams

Individual

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position

Vocation: Mathematician/programmer, technology policy advocate

Employer: .nai project

Position: Coordinator

2. Type of work performed in #1 above

Implementation of a registry services capable platform, DAG review, preliminary application development, status reporting to stakeholders.

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement.

None, though I operate on a pro-bono basis, an accredited registrar.

4. Identify any type of commercial or non-commercial interest in ICANN GNSO policy development processes and outcomes. Are you representing other parties? Describe any arrangements/agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination/selection as a work team member. Describe any tangible or intangible benefit that you receive from participation in such processes. For example, if you are an academic or NGO and use your position to advance your ability to participate, this should be a part of the statement of interest, just as should employment by a contracted party, or a business relationship with a non- contracted party who has an interest in policy outcomes.

I am unable to identify any tangible or intangible benefit from volunteering to participate in the ICANN GNSO policy development process.

If, and when, ICANN announces that applications for new gTLDs will be accepted, then tangible and/or intangible benefit will exist and this SOI updated.

Sébastien Bachollet

ALAC

See: http://www.icann.org/en/committees/alac/bachollet.html

Tijani Ben Jemaa

At Large

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position
Executive Director of the Mediterranean Federation of Internet Associations (FMAI)

2. Type of work performed in 1 above
Executive Director

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement
None

4. Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes. Are you representing other parties?
None. No

5. Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member
None

6. Geographic Region associated with the nationality of volunteer (Africa, North America, Latin America/Caribbean, Asia/Australia/Pacific and Europe)
Africa

7. Stakeholder Group(s) in which volunteer currently participates within the ICANN organization
AFRALO / At-Large

Fabien Betremieux

Individual - AFNIC

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position

Employer: AFNIC, non-profit in charge of .fr, .re and several other ccTLDs with a "co-development" developing country outreach program ( http://www.afnic.fr/afnic/international/college_en ).
Position : Registry Services Development and International Cooperation

2. Type of work performed in 1 above

Provision of registry services to new gTLD applicants Provision of expertise & tools to ccTLD managers of developping countries through a capacity building approach (the "International College")

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership
interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement

None

4. Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes. Are you representing other parties?

AFNIC has a commercial interest in the provision of registry services to new gTLD applicants.

5. Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member

None

6. Geographic Region associated with the nationality of volunteer (Africa, North America, Latin America/Caribbean, Asia/Australia/Pacific and Europe)

Europe; Stakeholder Group(s) in which volunteer currently participates within the ICANN organization

Supporting the City of Paris' representative in his role as an observer to the GNSO/RySG

Olga Cavalli

Nominating Committee Appointee

See: http://gnso.icann.org/council/soi/cavalli-soi-09april09.html

 

Rafik Dammak

Non Commercial Stakeholder Group

1. Current vocation, employer and position

Research Student, University of Tokyo

2. Type of work performed in 1 above
Research/Academic

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement

none

4. Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes. Are you representing other parties?
none

5. Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member
none

6. Geographic Region associated with the nationality of volunteer (Africa, North America, Latin America/Caribbean, Asia/Australia/Pacific and Europe)
Africa

7. Stakeholder Group(s) in which volunteer currently participates within the ICANN organization
NCSG

Avri Doria

Non Commercial Stakeholder Group

JAS co-chair

 

Updated: 27 April 2010

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position

I am a portfolio worker in the field of technical and policy system architectures and currently have the following mix of employment:
a. I have a part time position as Adjunct Professor at Luleå University of Technology;
b. I work under a recurring part time contract for the IGF Secretariat;
c. I am a listed affiliate of Interisle;
d. I act as an independent consultant to clients considering application in the forthcoming gTLD process.

2. Type of Work

With regard to each of the employers in question 1 above:
a. LTU: I am a research professor working on Delay Tolerant Networking Technology under a European Commission research grant. Supervise the research of several students. Do a research of my own on routing in a DTN and on methods of network management in a DTN.
b. UN/IGF: Assist in preparing papers of various sorts, provide technical consultation on issues in Internet governance.
c. Interisle: no contracts at the moment.
d. Consulting: I provide advice for possible applicants for community based gTLDs. For the most part, I provide this as an incidental service in exchange for coffee and pastry, while for others I set up a longer term consultant agreement that includes payment. My consultant agreement includes the following: “Nothing in this agreement commits Avri Doria to take any particular positions within ICANN, any ICANN internal organizations or working groups. With regard to Internet technical or policy work, Avri Doria remains a free agent except as constrained by any non disclosure agreements agreed to by both parties.”
3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement.

None

4. Identify any type of commercial or non-commercial interest in ICANN GNSO policy development processes and outcomes. Are you representing other parties? Describe any arrangements/agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination/selection as a work team member.

I am a member and currently serve as the Chair of the NCSG Executive Committee and do represent them in other groups such as the OSC. In this role, while I do need to explain my reasoning to the NCSG membership I am not bound in the positions I take. Of course if my positions were to start to run counter to the interests of the NCSG as perceived by its membership, they may remove me from my seat on the Executive Committee. I would probably remove myself before that happened.
I do not represent the views of any client I may have and always insist that I remain a free agent in any agreement. I will leave any employment that attempts to restrict this free agency and understand that any employer unhappy with my expressed views may discontinue their agreement with me.
Specific statement regarding the various groups that I may be engaged in:
I represent the the NCSG in the OSC
In the PDP and WG work teams and in the COTS work team, as well as the VI WG and the newgtldapsup WG I participate in my own capacity but do have a special concern for the interests of international non commercial users of the Internet and for their adequate representation and opportunities in ICANN processes.

5. Describe any tangible or intangible benefit that you receive from participation in such processes. For example, if you are an academic or NGO and use your position to advance your ability to participate, this should be a part of the statement of interest, just as should employment by a contracted party, or a business relationship with a non- contracted party who has an interest in policy outcomes.

As far as my university position goes, they could not care less about ICANN and generally consider it an interference in my work. In terms of my work in the IGF, I am sure the knowledge I have about how things work in ICANN and what goes on is an advantage. It is possible that consulting opportunities may be made possible by my range of volunteer activities in ICANN and the opinions I express and postions I take in those activities. Other then that, I think I am an 'ICANN Addict', someone who cares about the organization in many respects and wants to participate to make sure it comes out right. Specific statement regarding the various groups that I may be engaged in:
Re VIWG: As far as VI is concerned, it is critical the GNSO come up with a policy rather quickly and come up with a good policy that has consensus. This will be both interesting and challenging. I enjoy participating in things that are interesting and challenging and I suppose that is also something I will get out of this process.
Re: newgtldapsup WG, I have been concerned since the time when I was a member of the GNSO with pricing policies that would make new gTLDs prohibitively expensive for those who have a good social or cultural use/need but who do not have deep pockets. Doing this satisfy a personal need to see social justice done in any business I may be involved in.
Re OSC membership as well as participation in PPSC PDP and WG Work Teams and the OSC Council Operations Team: this for me is work that was left incomplete from my service as council chair. Working as a member of these groups is part of my self definition as one who see tasks through to the end. I find living within my own self definition to be critical to my mental well being.

6. Location

I maintain residences in Providence USA and Luleå Sweden and split my time between these locations, a hotel in Geneva Switzerland and various airports.
7. Stakeholder Group

I am a member of the NCSG and currently serve as Chair of its Executive Committee.

William Drake

Non Commercial Stakeholder Group

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position

Senior Associate Centre for International Governance Graduate Institute of International and
Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland

2. Type of work performed in 1 above

Academic & some policy consulting, none involving ICANN

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement

None

4. Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes. Are you representing other parties?

None

5. Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member

None

Alex Gakuru

Non Commercial Stakeholder Group

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position

Primarily an ICT systems consultant trading as Way Forward Technologies. Self-employed and holds Lead Consultant title. Also serves as (unpaid) Chairman, ICT Consumers Association of Kenya. Recently appointed as Councilor, Broadcast Content Advisory Council – Communications Commission of Kenya – the converged national ICT sector regulator.

2. Type of work performed in 1 above

Way Forward Technologies develops and deploys integrated information and communications technologies content solutions thus consults mainly in the following areas databases, software development, open source software, ICT Migration, digital animation, project management, telecommunications consultancy, training, and ICT research services. As chair ICT Consumers Association of Kenya, and closely working with civil society, human rights and social justice organisations, my work involves promoting consumer rights and interests through constructive engagements with all ICT stakeholders (government, regulator and private sector players). Through the media brings consumer rights to the fore in regard to policy, legislation, regulation and at the market place.

As member Broadcast Content Advisory Council, my advisory duties are to advise the regulator on the content that is broadcast on Kenyan public communications space and its adherence to the National ICT Policy, Kenya Information and Communications Act, and all relevant regulations.

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement

No financial, ownership, or senior management interest in any registry, registrar, ccTLD, Internet technologies or equipment firms, or other firms that are interested in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement.

4. Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes. Are you representing other parties?

I do not have any commercial interest in ICANN policy outcomes and I represent no other parties.

5. Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member

None.

6. Geographic Region associated with the nationality of volunteer (Africa, North America, Latin America/Caribbean, Asia/Australia/Pacific and Europe)

Africa (Kenya)

7. Stakeholder Group(s) in which volunteer currently participates within the ICANN organization

A member of the Noncommercial Stakeholder Group(NCSG) where I am leading the Consumer Interest Group. I was elected (in 2009) as Africa Representative, Non Commercial Users Constituency (NCUC). I participate on PDP-WT and now JAS WG - for which I write this SOI.

Dr. Govind

GAC - India

 

Alan Greenberg

ALAC

See: http://gnso.icann.org/issues/vertical-integration/soi-vi-pdp-wg-01apr10-en#greenberg

 

Anthony Harris

Internet Service and Connectivity Providers Constituency

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position
Executive Director of Argentina Internet Association – CABASE; Executive Director of Latin America and Caribbean Federation of Internet and Electronic Commerce - eCOM-LAC

2. Type of work performed in 1 above
Non-profit Association tasks - Internet services development and regulatory work, representation in global Internet fora.

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement
None whatsoever

4. Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes. Are you representing other parties?
Interest in new gTLDs, as a potential applicant. No other parties represented.

5. Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member
Am a member of the ISPCP constituency.

6. Geographic Region associated with the nationality of volunteer (Africa, North America, Latin America/Caribbean, Asia/Australia/Pacific and Europe)
Latin America/Caribbean

7. Stakeholder Group(s) in which volunteer currently participates within the ICANN organization
CSG

Dave Kissoondoyal

At Large

See: http://gnso.icann.org/issues/post-expiration-recovery/soi-pednr-20july09.html#kissoondoyal

 

Evan Leibovitch

ALAC

JAS co-chair

See: http://gnso.icann.org/issues/registration-abuse/soi-rap-22july09.html#

 

Andrew Mack

CBUC

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position

I am Principal of AMGlobal Consulting, a boutique consulting firm based in the US (DC area) working with emerging markets and technology issues.

2. Type of work performed in 1 above

We work with companies and donor agencies interested in doing more work in emerging markets, looking at how new technology and tech policy is developing in these markets, and how technology will affect the development of these markets.

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement

None.

4.Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes. Are you representing other parties?

Our firm has done consulting at different points for a range of clients (companies, donors, trade associations and regional business coalitions) interested in how internet governance issues might affect future business and the business environment. We specialize in work with Africa and Latin America. I would be participating in my personal capacity and not representing the views of anyone else.

5.Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member

None

6. Geographic Region associated with the nationality of volunteer (Africa, North America, Latin America/Caribbean, Asia/Australia/Pacific and Europe)

North America/USA

7. Stakeholder Group(s) in which volunteer currently participates within the ICANN organization   I'm a new member of the BC.

Michele Neylon

Registrar Stakeholder Group

See: http://www.mneylon.com/blog/statement-of-interest.html

Cheryl Langdon-Orr

ALAC

See: http://gnso.icann.org/issues/vertical-integration/soi-vi-pdp-wg-01apr10-en#langdon-orr

Elaine Pruis

Individual

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position

Vice President, Client Relations at Minds + Machines

2. Type of work performed in 1 above

M+M is a Registry Services provider and Consulting firm for new TLD applicants. My role is to participate in ICANN policy creation, instruct clients on new TLD application requirements, and liaise with the technical staff on developing the registry software to meet the established requirements.

As the previous Liaison for CoCCA (Council of Country Code Administrators, a group of ccTLD operators that share resources and registry tools) I have nearly a decade of experience working with third world and post conflict ccTLD operators such as Afghanistan. I'm deeply interested in ensuring that the new TLD process is inclusive and all interested parties have the opportunity to apply and launch viable TLDs.

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement

I am a senior manager for a registry services provider and new TLD consulting company.

4. Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes. Are you representing other parties?

a. ICANN policy directly influences the way we will operate our business. Requirements on registries such as Escrow, PDDRP etc do matter. However, creating support for disadvantaged applicants does not have a commercial affect on M+M, therefore my participation in this particular working group is the most neutral it could possibly be in this phase of ICANN's policy development.

b. No.

5. Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member

None.

6. Geographic Region associated with the nationality of volunteer (Africa, North America, Latin America/Caribbean, Asia/Australia/Pacific and Europe)

North America.

7. Stakeholder Group(s) in which volunteer currently participates within the ICANN organization

As a new company without any TLDs in the root, M+M is not a formal member of the Registry SO but I suppose that is where we would fit if we were allowed.

Vanda Scartezini

Individual

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position
a) Partner POLO Consultores Associados and IT TREND Consulting
b) ALTIS Software & Services ( www.altis.org.br ) and FITEC ( www.fitec.org.br ) (telecommunications & IT research and development)
c) Nexti ( ALS under LACRALO – association of ITC executive women)

2. Type of work performed in 1 above
a) Consulting senior partner; b) Chair of the board; c) Vice chair

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement.
None

4. Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes.
Advisor of a potential new gTLD without compensation.
4.1 Are you representing other parties? NO

5. Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member
None

6. Geographic Region associated with the nationality of volunteer (Africa, North America, Latin America/Caribbean, Asia/Australia/Pacific and Europe)
LATIN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN

7. Stakeholder Group(s) in which volunteer currently participates within the ICANN organization
I am acting as liaison to the board of ICANN representing ALAC
I am also member of an ALS under LACRALO.

Baudouin Schombe

AFRALO  - At large

 

1. Current vocation, employer and position

ICT Academy agency manager, I am involved in Icann towards CAFEC NGO like African ALS. I am now GNSO/NCUC member. National Coordinator Of NGO network called “Réseau National des ONG pour la Promotion des NTIC” (RERONTIC) and Gaid member for African Civil Society for Information Society ( ACSIS).

2. Type of work performed in 1 above

Implementing ICT community access (telecentre). Supporting ccTLD redelegation for DR Congo. Organizing training for different community in grass-root level.

3. Identify any financial ownership or senior management/leadership interest in registries, registrars or other firms that are interested parties in ICANN policy or any entity with which ICANN has a transaction, contract, or other arrangement

none

4. Identify any type of commercial interest in ICANN policy development outcomes. Are you representing other parties?

No commercial interest. My representation role is under AFRALO, Regional At-Large Organisation for Africa

5. Describe any arrangements or agreements between you and any other group, constituency or person(s) regarding your nomination or selection as an advisory group team member

AFRALO MEMBERS: no any arrangement or agreement but I am sure to have their support

6. Geographic Region associated with the nationality of volunteer (Africa, North America, Latin America/Caribbean, Asia/Australia/Pacific and Europe)

AFRICA

7. Stakeholder Group(s) in which volunteer currently participates within the ICANN organization
I am involved in various Icann community: NCUC/GNSO, Vertical Integration, IRTP B and BCEC

Alioune Traore

Individual

 

Richard Tindal Individual

Individual

See: http://gnso.icann.org/issues/vertical-integration/soi-vi-pdp-wg-01apr10-en#tindal

 


1.3    Attendance

This attendance record is for the weekly conference calls in 2010. The legend used is:

 

 

 

 

 


  1. Summary and Analysis - Snapshot Public 

Comments Received from June 16 to August 23 2010

 

The full text of the comments received can be found at: http://www.icann.org/en/public-comment/#wg-snapshot .

 

2.1 Overview

  • The English language public comment period ran from 16 June 2010 to 21 July 2010.
  • An extended public comment period to accommodate French, Spanish, Arabic, Russian, Chinese ran from 23 July 2010 to 23 August 2010.
  • There were thirteen (13) submissions from eight (8) different parties:
    • AfriICANN/AFRALO Statement
    • Danny Younger
    • Stefano Cimatoribus
    • George Kirikos - Leap of Faith Financial Services Inc.
    • Jeff Neuman – Neustar
    • Dr. Ibaa Oueichek - Arab Team for domain names and Internet issues
    • Michele Neylon :: Blacknight
    • Debra Y. Hughes - American Red Cross
  • Note: The AfriICANN/Afralo Statement was presented at the ICANN Brussels meeting and also submitted to the public forum.

 

2.2 Summary of Comments and WG Analysis

The comments captured below are excerpts of the actual comments and have been organized by topic followed by a short summary of the WG discussions.

 

2.2.1 From: ICANN African Community (22 June 2010)

The Members of the African Community, consisting of the AFRALO and the AfrICANN, attending the 38th ICANN meeting in Brussels, jointly discussed the possible support to be given to new gTLD applicants in Africa, who need assistance in applying for, and operating the gTLDs. As members of the community, we:

  • Welcome the Board resolution 20 related to the support for Applicants requesting assistance in applying for and operating new gTLDs.
  • Express our gratitude to the Board members for their consideration of the community concerns about the cost of applying for new gTLDs that might hinder applicants, especially those from developing countries.
  • Strongly believe that entrepreneur applicants from African countries, where the market is not wide enough for a reasonable profit making industry, are eligible for support.
  • Deem that Civil society, NGOs and non for profit organizations in Africa are the most in need of such support, because they have a deep impact in society since they work at the grass-root level.
  • Believe that support is of utmost importance for geographic, cultural linguistic, and more generally community based applications.
  • Urge that support to new gTLD applicants in Africa be prioritised since this support will be an incitement for new aspirants to come forward and apply for new gTLDs.
  • Believe that the support to be provided to applicants of new gTLDs in Africa should include, but is not limited to the following:

        Financial, by reducing the application and the on-going fees

        Linguistic, by translating all the application documents, especially the Applicant Guidebook, in the six UN languages

        Legal, by assisting the applicants in preparing their applications properly.

        Technical, by

  • helping the applicants to define the infrastructure options,
  • addressing the issue of infrastructure problems in some African countries; such as IPV6, internet connectivity etc.
  • Strongly support that cost reduction is the key element in fulfilling the goals of ICANN Board’s Resolution 20 within the principles of the recovery of the application and on-going costs.
  • Propose that the following be entertained to achieve cost reduction:

        Waiving the cost of Program Development ($26k).

        Waiving the Risk/Contingency cost ($60k).

        Lowering the application cost ($100k)

        Waiving the Registry fixed fees ($25k per calendar year), and charge the Registry-Level Transaction Fee only ($0.25 per domain name registration or renewal).

  • Propose that the reduced cost be paid incrementally, which will give the African applicants more time to raise money, and investors will be more encouraged to fund an application that passes the initial evaluation.
  • Believe that African communities apply for new gTLDs according to an appropriate business model taking into consideration the realities of the African region. ICANN’s commitment towards supporting gTLD applicants in Africa will be a milestone to the development of the overall Internet community in Africa
  • Since Africa is disadvantaged and lagging behind due to the digital divide, we strongly suggest that ICANN provides supplementary support and additional cost reduction for gTLDs applications from African countries

WG discussion summary:

The Milestone Report has been further clarified in relation to who can apply, particularly the fact that the recommendations are not restricted to non-for-profits. For all applicants, regardless of the entity type, the main criterion for eligibility is need and support would not be given through this program unless the need criterion is met. The WG nevertheless believes that by narrowing the initial focus/round to a relatively limited identifiable set of potential applicants, the proposed applicant support program would potentially present political resistance and be controversy. This is why the cultural, linguistic and ethnic groups are proposed as a starting point and this could be revisited for future rounds.

It has also been a consensus among the WG members that the funds should not be further limited or prioritize applicants from a certain geographic location.  The WG recognizes there might be applicants from Africa that are disadvantaged for a whole host of reasons, for instance political, economic, linguistic, logistical, etc. However, the proposal presented at this time does not envision automatically qualifying nor prioritizing an applicant for support simply based on a specific continent of origin/establishment. One must take into account that countries and entities within a specific continent and country have diversity in financial status and needs. Detailed discussions about the practical aspects of such criterion for prioritization presented to be challenging and unnecessarily open doors to various forms of gaming, which would be difficult to address, at least at this stage of the New gTLD Program getting close to launch.

The WG further acknowledges that the definition of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) may differ depending on the jurisdiction and the organizations legal status could also change over the course of time. Another important point is the fact that just because an entity is an NGO, it does not make it necessarily in need of support since there are many examples of NGOs around the world have adequate resources.

There were some concerns raised by the WG during this discussion, for example:

  • Should we speak of future rounds not knowing if they will happen and if they do when?
  • Are we at risk to limit innovation if targeting the support during the first round to the linguistic and ethnic group only?

 

2.2.2 From: G. Kirikos (20 July 2010)

ICANN does not value public input . We will passively resist by not participating in a process that only leads to predetermined outcomes. We request that ICANN notify the community when it is ready and willing to demonstrate that it properly values public comments.

WG discussion summary:

This comment is not directly related to this WG proposal or work, however it should be noted that this WG has listened and responded to comments.

 

2.2.3 From: Neustar; Blacknight Solutions (21 July 2010)

 

(Neustar) Agreement that support should be provided for certain gTLD applicants in some limited cases .

  • Neustar agrees that in some limited circumstances special consideration should be given to applicants proposing certain types of gTLDs, who otherwise would not have the financial means or access to resources or expertise required to participate.
  • Neustar supports the staggered fee approach recommended by the Working Group and the use of some portion of any auction proceeds to provide a partial refund of application fees to qualified applicants.
  • Given the challenge posed by a minimum annual fee of $25,000 for some disadvantaged applicants, Neustar supports elimination or reduction of fees for disadvantaged applicants, but only in circumstances where registration volumes do not support payment of the annual minimum.
  • The Working Group’s proposed initial qualifications and criteria are appropriate (targeting certain communities, geographies and languages), but some additional thought should be given to the evaluation process for applicants wishing to participate, including the timing and resources required. Transparency--including information about the applicants, program applications, and financial or other support--is important to foster confidence in the program.
  • Neustar intends to participate in the program by providing support of some kind to qualified Applicants.

 

 

(Blacknight Solutions) ICANN seems to think that TLDs in the “new regime” need to be slotted into a “one size fits all” scenario. This is neither realistic not does it truly fit with ICANN’s own goals which are often summed up by Rod Beckstrom as “One World. One Internet. Everyone Connected.” To make this a reality, economic barriers need to be removed where appropriate. The Working Group documents recognize that strict criteria for economic exceptions need to be laid down and that only a limited number of applicants would meet the criteria. Several companies, including Blacknight Solutions, have stated that they would be willing to offer services to qualified applicants .

WG discussion summary:

The WG welcomes the involvement and intent to support several entities have expressed in the past months and expects a larger number of companies and individuals come forward to join and strengthen this program. 

The Milestone Report acknowledges that applicants can benefit from a broad range of assistance beyond financial, including logistical, outreach, technical, administrative (application), etc. This broad range of assistance adds flexibility and diversity to a support program that hopefully can increase participation in the New gTLD process from around the world.

Although the Milestone Report presents a broad range of recommendations and there has been an effort to make it comprehensive, at this phase of the work, the recommendations detailed. The WG believe this is a beginning and further work will be carried not only by staff and policy, but also by various parties interested in helping in this evolving initiative. With this approach, the WG also believes there is more flexibility added to the implementation process and expects to see some or most aspects of the Milestone Report implemented in the first round.

 

2.2.4 From: American Red Cross (22 July 2010)

Not-for-profit organizations—request that ICANN set lower costs .  Not-for-profit groups are concerned about the costs of the new gTLD program, both application-related and enforcement-related. The Red Cross strongly urges ICANN to consider that not-for-profit organizations may use a proposed new gTLD for internal business purposes under a model that is different from a commercial, profit-driven new gTLD.  Red Cross is concerned that the various costs place the acquisition of a new gTLD out of reach of most not-for-profit organizations. The fees represent resources that must be allocated from funds that Red Cross and other groups would otherwise spend on directly serving the public. Red Cross requests that ICANN set a lower cost for not-for-profit organizations such as Red Cross in light of the significant and important role new gTLDs owned by these groups would serve for the ICANN community.

 

Support for Working Team 1 recommendations .  Red Cross agrees with the intent of the following Working Team 1 recommendations: waiving the cost of Program Development for selected entities; staggered fees; auction proceeds—partial refund; lower registry fixed fees due to ICANN; reconsideration of the risk/contingency cost per applicant; and consideration of reduction of the fixed/variable cost of US $100K for applicants that meet the Working Group criteria.

Working Team 2 Recommendations : Red Cross offers the following comments:

  • Initial/pilot phase—also support not-for-profit organizations : Red Cross agrees with targeting support to ethnic and linguistic communities and also proposes that support be given to not-for-profit organizations during the initial/pilot phase.
  • Red Cross disagrees with the recommendation that support for other groups, especially NGOs and civil society organizations, should be addressed at a later point . We strongly urge the Working Group and ICANN to consider support for not-for-profit organizations as soon as possible. Red Cross recommends immediate support during the initial/pilot phase for not-for-profit organizations that would use a new gTLD to communicate with the public about their mission and services, to engage in activities to increase social inclusion of non-governmental organizations with technology, to distribute educational, informational or lifesaving information to members of their communities, or to collect donations to support their operations. These potential applicants, whose mission, objectives and status can be verified and approved by the Working Group/ICANN criteria, are the type of potential applicants for which support is non-controversial.
  • Red Cross agrees that the geographic location of the applicant is one of many factors that could be considered when deciding to provide support to applicants.
  • Red Cross believes that the recommendations regarding groups not to be supported at this time lack sufficient specificity to provide meaningful comments.
  • Significant outreach and education efforts are needed and should begin immediately and then increase once the final Applicant Guidebook is released, allowing for the ability to timely ask questions and seek guidance . ICANN should make information readily available about the new gTLD processes and procedures to potential applicants in underserved markets and to certain groups such as not-for-profit organizations that may not be as engaged in ICANN activities. ICANN should improve its education and outreach services especially to not-for-profit organizations such as Red Cross to ensure that its user community is able to navigate the process and is not excluded or negatively impacted.
  • In the outreach the provided information should address the application process as well as information of interest to those not applying for new gTLDs (e.g. objection procedures, rights protection mechanisms). Also, advice about the technical requirements for operating a new TLD (e.g. details of Modules 2 and 5) should be provided in this outreach to these targeted populations, regions and organizations, especially since those details are likely to be daunting to groups that have not previously op erated a registry.
  • Outreach should occur in all five ICANN regions and ICANN should provide live, in-person seminars open to the public, rather than only posting educational information on the ICANN website or hosting webinars.
  • Fee reduction /subsidization and/or phased in payment of fees for deserving applicants. Red Cross supports the intent of this recommendation. The current proposed payment schedule and fees will be prohibitive and could impact the ability of not-for-profit organizations to fund and fulfill their mission-related activities and objectives.
  • Technical support (infrastructure, education/consulting regarding DNSSEC, possible technical waivers or “step ups”, lower cost or shared back end registry services) .  Red Cross supports the intent of the recommendation especially since many applicants will be new to registry operations. Red Cross generally supports discounted pricing for or assistance with new gTLD back end registry services.
  • Support for build out in underserved languages, IDNs for new gTLDs, price discounts to incentivize build out in scripts with limited web presence, bundled pricing to promote build out in multiple scripts at once, tests to prevent gaming and ensure support reaches its targets .  Generally Red Cross supports discounted pricing for new gTLDs.

WG discussion summary:

The WG thanks the Red Cross and all other entities that explicitly took the time to support this important work. Some of the points raised were clarified in previous comment analysis, for example the simple fact that en entity holds a non-profit status, it does not mean this entity is financially unable to cover the fees and meets the “need” criterion.

The WG further acknowledges that the Red Cross notion of non-profit refers specifically to charitable and service organizations that attempt to keep the overhead as low as possible so that most of their funding can go to the victims/causes they are meant to help.

It is important to stress that the most important criterion is the need.  At this stage, the need criterion is more important than the intention of the string or the structure or form of the applicant. The intent is, for the initial round, to focus and narrow the support to ethnic/linguistic communities since this is a less controversial group and will likely generate political support for this initiative. Also, these potential applicants have the benefits of being relatively well defined as groups, and pass the test of being generally non-controversial. Such communities already have a history of recognition at ICANN and facilitating community on the Internet is one of ICANN’s core values. Within the WG there was some sentiment that support might be offered to groups that provide assistance to underserved communities, including in rare cases to applicants that might otherwise not qualify on the basis of need.

 

2.2.5 From:  Arab Team (21 July 2010)

The Government support prohibition is overbroad, and the financial instrument requirement in case of registry failure is major barrier to entry . The Arab Team appreciates ICANN’s and the Working Group’s recognition of the important issue of applicant support.  The ICANN GAC communiqué in connection with the issue of inclusiveness as a priority and not through program requirements excluding developing country stakeholders from participating in the new gTLD process is also important. Two important points need to be taken into account before issuance of a Milestone Report:

(1) The proposal to prohibit “any” support from applications in connection with governments is overly broad and inappropriate;

(2) While we are supportive of the need to ensure the protection of registrants in the event of a registry failure, the primary reliance by ICANN on a financial instrument is misguided. Other mechanisms exist to safeguard registrants in case of a registry failure. The potential posting of a financial instrument prior to launch of the gTLD represents a much more substantial barrier to entry than the application fee. The Working Group should address what other support mechanisms exist in the potential case of registry failure and how they could be made available to applicants.

WG discussion summary:

The Milestone Report has further clarified the issue raised. It is not the intent of the WG to propose that governments do not qualify or cannot participate to receive support through this program. Nevertheless, after careful consideration, it has been consensus of the WG that the support should not be used to subsidize a largely and purely government initiative. That said, if the proposal requesting assistance is majority government funding or a majority government sponsor, it should not qualify.

The WG acknowledges that this is a complex issue, particularly for the first round and raises important questions, such as: (a) Are governments part of a needy group? (b) How should a government led initiative be defined?

The proposal implementation details might require further details that address definition of projects in terms of persons, percentages, which would lead to a difficult and potentially controversial implementation process.

The WG reached a consensus that the current proposal should stay as it is, with additional clarification that an applicant with a government funding might qualify for support, however, the support is not intended for applications that are primarily government financed and supported.

The WG also agrees that it would be better if the program was multilingual, but it is difficult to implement in this round since it would require a major revamping of ICANN’s processes and operations. ICANN needs to continue ensuring that informational materials are available in multiple languages. The WG further acknowledges that part of the support that can be offered to applicants is assistance with English applications and contracts (ICANN Registry Agreement).

In terms of the continuity instrument, the WG did discuss this issue and recommended some possible solutions. As part of the continuing work being considered for charter extension, this will be looked at further.

 

2.2.6 From: D. Younger (24 June 2010)

NGO Domain Proposal .  The time is ripe for a new general organizational category TLD managed by IANA on a non-fee basis to serve the needs of the developing world in a sustainable manner and obviate the prospect of a multitude of new TLD applications each requiring some degree of support provisioning. The creation of a new TLD offering a form of relief to the disadvantaged among us should not have to be complex but should be a fairly straightforward proposition that reflects the community’s will and commitment.

  • An NGO domain comports well with fulfilling ICANN’s charitable mission.
  • An NGO domain would meet the principles set forth by the ICANN Business Constituency that new TLDs must meet (i.e., differentiation, certainty, honesty, competition, diversity and meaning). 
  • By aggregating a class under a single TLD, differentiation is possible at the second level. Organizations will find a place where they want to be and these NGOs will readily be found by their respective user communities at the second level.
  • ICANN’s current contingency fund is more than ample to fund the IANA’s new duties on a first year basis; thereafter such charitable expenditures would become their own line in a line-item budget that would highlight IANA’s charitable operations. In all likelihood IANA will not seek to invoke cost recovery measures, so the recovery cost of the NGO domain proposal will not be passed on to the disadvantaged that seek to use such registry services.
  • The NGO domain approach is fiscally prudent; through it we can see if a substantial portion of the needs of those that work at the grass-roots level who lack the financial resources to support a registry operation (and whose needs perhaps might not be fully met by .ORG or through other current TLDs) can be met by the NGO domain.  After that it can be determined if further initiatives are still warranted in order to better promote geographic, cultural and linguistic considerations.
  • IANA is provisioned to implement the offering of the NGO domain at the root level in characters other than ASCII if that is necessary, and given IANA’s origins and role there is a comfort level with designation of IANA as the trustee of the TLD for the global Internet community.
  • Eligibility criteria for the NGO domain would need to be defined carefully by the Working Group and some documentation would be required—i.e., a charter or founding papers should likely be sufficient for the record.

WG discussion summary:

The Milestone Report has been further clarified in relation to who can apply, particularly the fact that the recommendations are not restricted to non-for-profits. For all applicants, regardless of the entity type, the main criterion for eligibility is need and support would not be given through this program unless the need criterion is met. The WG nevertheless believes that by narrowing the initial focus/round to a relatively limited identifiable set of potential applicants, the proposed applicant support program would potentially present political resistance and be controversy. This is why the cultural, linguistic and ethnic groups are proposed as a starting point and this could be revisited for future rounds.

Regarding the proposed examples and approach to simplify the program, although it has merit, it is important to remember that the complexity of the New gTLD Program is relative to the complexity of the New gTLD Policy developed by the GNSO. This policy was a long process of consensus building that took into account the experiences from previous rounds and needs of the market place.

 

2.2.7 From: D. Younger (17 July 2010)

Ongoing costs in the event of registry failure—assistance measures . While registrant protection is critical and critical registry functions must be sustained for an extended period of time in the event of registry failure, the 3-5 year timeframe established by ICANN in the DAG does not comport with the recommendations in the ICANN gTLD Registry Failover Plan presented on 15 June 2008.

  • The Failover Plan calls for a timeframe of highly limited duration (30 to 90 days or more).
  • The Failover Plan is completely at odds with the DAG’s requirement for a financial surety instrument to guarantee continuity for critical registry functions for 3-5 years subsequent to a registry failure.
  • The first step in reducing the financial instrument requirement has already been taken (see statement from ICANN staff regarding Benchmarking of Registry Operations that it is possible that continuity and registrant protection can still be met with a slightly reduced reserve requirement—i.e. 2 years of funding instead of 3 years). The Working Group should now press home the point that timeframes (and consequent costs) may logically be reduced further based on earlier communitywide Failover conclusions.
  • Taking a conservative approach, a first step could be to stipulate to a financial instrument that supports critical registry functions for 180 days subsequent to the declaration of a registry “event”. This is realistic and exceeds the Failover Plan recommendations.
  • It should be considered whether a way can be formulated by which a potential successor operator can be pre-designated so that the extended financial surety obligation may be completely waived.  Reducing or eliminating the
    DAG’s required financial surety instrument would go a long ways toward providing real support to new gTLD applicants. The Working Group can draw from ICANN’s prior experience with a pre-designation process (in .net and .org) in establishing a new procedure to prepare for a possible successor operator as part of each support-requiring-registry’s Continuity Plan.

WG discussion summary:

See response to 2.2.5

 

2.2.8 From: D. Younger (17 July 2010)

Cultural and Linguistic TLDs—Proposal for Support and New Fast-Track Program . Cultural and linguistic TLDs should be treated in a fashion akin to new IDN TLD applicants (rather than as new gTLDs); they could well deserve their own unique class designation as clTLDs.

  • The Working Group should make the case that it would be “good policy” that comports with ICANN’s charitable and educational mission to establish a new fast-track program for cultural and linguistic TLDs with clearly defined requirements.
  • It may be advisable to agree to a minimal applicant fee for cultural and linguistic TLDs, similar to what has been calculated for IDN TLD applicants, and to agree to preparation of a pre-arranged and recommended annual registry contribution document.
  • Considerations include: how large of an applicant pool is expected; and what portion of that applicant pool has a legitimate need for financial assistance? It is unclear if cultural communities are adequately served by .org or by their respective ccTLDs, so the process should begin with a campaign to solicit expressions of interest to better outline the scope and range of the potential applicant pool.

WG discussion summary:

This was out of scope for this WG.

 

2.2.9 From: D. Younger (17 July 2010)

Registrar Transaction Fee--Support for Disadvantaged gTLD Applicants . An increase in the registrar transaction fee (at a current low of eighteen cents) should be used to support disadvantaged gTLD applicants. It is not unreasonable to ask the broader registrant community to participate in supporting the expansion of the namespace, as such expansion will better serve the long-term broad registrant interest.  Establishing a Foundation to properly manage such funding and to serve as a point of contact for charitable giving is a proper way forward.

WG discussion summary:

The Milestone Report presents ICANN and the community with diverse and specific ways to address the funding needs for this program. The WG believes there are several funding ways that should be explored before considering increasing the registrar transaction fees, since this would comes from the pocket of the registrant (user).

From an implementations stand point, changes to registrar contracts are not an easy process and, overall, would add complexity and likely raise political issues.

Also, it is important to remember that the policy clearly states that the New gTLD Program should be self financing.

There is consensus in the WG for a proposal recommending that registrars put in place the means for existing registrants to make voluntary contributions to the development program through registrar-to-registry contribution pass-through, and to find ways of enabling non-registrant small donors to contribute to the development program.  Concurrent with the execution of the development message to the donor communities, that the development message should also be delivered to the registrant, and non-registrant user communities through internal and external media.

There is also a minority concern about the degree to which Registrars would be open to this suggestion and the manner of its implementation.

 

2.2.10 From: S. Cimatoribus (20 July 2010); D. Younger (18 June 2010)

Bundling of Applications—Reduced Fee Proposal

 

S. Cimatoribus - There should be a discounted fee for bundled applications with extra languages. ICANN should adjust the budget for application processing so that bundled IDN applications have lower costs and lower application fees. ICANN should encourage applicants to propose IDN versions of their preferred TLD string (e.g., .flowers in Cyrillic); this would allow people to use domain names and emails in their mother language. There may not be very many IDN applications unless ICANN offers incentives or discounted fees on bundled applications that include non-Latin IDNs.

 

D. Younger - A bundled gTLD application is the equivalent of an ASCII gTLD application combined with an additional IDN gTLD application. The Working Group should propose that each additional script proposed by a gTLD applicant will be priced commensurate with the cost calculations for the fast-track IDN ccTLDs—namely $26,700 per script. Equivalency of treatment is the bigger issue—i.e., if a cost calculation has already been made for the processing of IDN applications, it would certainly be discriminatory (contrary to Section 3 of the ICANN By-laws) if an equivalent application were charged at a higher rate.

 

WG discussion summary:

Subject to the requirements for receiving support from the program, the WG believed that price reductions should be implemented to encourage the build out of IDNs in small or underserved languages, with the exact amount and timing of the support to be determined. There was a minority view from our Milestone Report that applicants who may not meet the need requirement for support but who have explicit endorsement from within the language community to be served should also be able to receive some form of support, for example bundling discounts, in order to offer these services to the underserved language/script community. This community endorsement must come from organizations, NGOs and/or local companies from within the language/script community.

 

2.2.11 From: D. Younger (19 July 2010)

Exception to Registry-Registrar Separation for certain groups . The Applicant Support Working Group should interact with the Vertical Integration Working Group to better define the public-interest-based exceptions category regarding registry-registrar separation so that a combined recommendation could be offered to the ICANN Board. Possible areas of exception include certain language groups, developing countries, certain communities due to size or economic conditions, etc. The Applicant Support Working Group will need to evaluate whether an exception for the registry operator is to be preferred over a subsidization effort to support a new local registrar.

WG discussion summary:

There was consensus that in cases where market power is not an issue, applicants who met the requirements for support would be granted a special exemption from the requirement for Registry-Registrar separation. This special exemption could be reviewed after 5 years. During the period of exemption, the ICANN compliance department/function would, at its own discretion, review to insure that the exemption was not being abused. This recommendation takes into account the advice given by the Government Advisory Committee (GAC) to the ICANN Board on 23 September 2010 [1] .


3.    Blog Posting - “Call for Input – Support for New gTLD

Applicants” - June 14

 

The WG posted a blog on ICANN’s site entitled: “Call for Input – Support for New gTLD Applicants.” The blog was posted on June 14, 2010. It received 5 comments that can be viewed here: http://blog.icann.org/2010/06/call-for-input-support-for-new-gtld-applicants/#comments . See below the original blog content:

 

Dear Registry Services Provider,

 

The ICANN board recently passed a resolution requesting that a Working Group develop a sustainable approach to providing support to applicants requiring assistance in applying for and operating new gTLDs. (http://www.icann.org/en/minutes/resolutions-12mar10-en.htm#20)

The Working Group has outlined five objectives, two of which are:

  • Objective 3: To identify what kinds of support (e.g. technical assistance, organizational assistance, financial assistance, fee reduction) and support timelines (e.g. support for the application period only, continuous support) are appropriate for new gTLD applicants fulfilling identified criteria.
  • Objective 4: To identify potential providers of the identified kinds of support as well as appropriate mechanisms to enable support provisioning.

We are seeking input from the community on these two objectives, and will create a "pool" of providers of these services for these applicants.  In order to progress with our work, we are asking for a “show of hands” from interested providers. 

The following types of support have been identified:

  • Extended outreach to potential applicants-to make them aware of the opportunity and to allow them extra time to prepare
  • Application writing assistance
  • Registry services-outsourced or assistance with local operations
  • DNS services
  • Infrastructure-IPV6 compatible hardware/networks
  • Education-DNSSEC implementation
  • Legal & documentation – providing support to cover legal costs or process docs
  • Translation – The Applicant Guidebook is only published in English- a disadvantage to many in the non-English speaking world
  • Training – in areas like building a sustainability plan, marketing, and operations
  • Assistance through the application process

 

Are there other types of support you could identify that a disadvantaged applicant might need to succeed in the gTLD application process?  

Would your organization consider providing any of the support functions for disadvantaged applicants for free, or on a cost recovery basis, or for reduced rates? Are you aware of any other providers (including yourself) that would support disadvantaged applicants?

Please post your responses to soac-newgtldapsup-wg@icann.org , the working group mailing list.

A session and public discussions on the topic are scheduled for the Brussels meeting.  There will be a public comment period and follow up with potential providers as the work progresses.

 

Thank you for your consideration.

Joint SO/AC Working Group on New gTLD Applicant Support


3. Text of Initial Snapshot Released on 16 June 2010

Introduction

Responding to a Board resolution in Nairobi, the GNSO Council initiated the launch of a Joint SO/AC Working Group on New gTLD Applicant Support, or JAS WG for short, launched in April 2010. The JAS WG wishes to report on its current status and findings to date, with a view to solicit public comments to guide further work. The WG decided early on to work in two parallel Working Teams; Working Team 1 focusing on application fee aspects and Working Team 2 addressing issues regarding which applicants would be entitled to special support and of what nature the support could be. Below are the current findings of the two Working Teams.

 

Working Team 1

Background

Working Team 1 is tasked with meeting the Working Group's Charter Objective 2: To identify how the net cost to applicants that fulfill appropriate criteria can be reduced, in keeping with the principle of cost recovery.

 

Process

WT1 examined how the application fee has been constructed and explained/justified in the cost consideration documents (1) and the DAG4 in order to determine if there is any potential for requesting the fees be revisited for applicants that meet the established criteria. The WT suggests several options for financial support of applicants. The first two proposals appear to have consensus; the remaining proposals are still under discussion.

The fee for applying for a new gTLD is US$185,000. The fee structure is divided as: 1. New gTLD Program Development Costs US$ 26,000 2. Fixed and variable Application evaluation costs - Predictable US$100,000 3. Risk/Contingency costs US$60,000

WT1 notes that the document New gTLD Program Explanatory Memorandum New gTLD Budget (2) indicates an expected net profit for the new gTLD program.

 

Proposals

The following suggestions have been formulated by WT1.

1. Waive the cost of Program Development (US$26K) for selected entities qualifying for financial assistance, especially since the development cost was designated for return to the ICANN reserve. It is common ICANN practice to reduce return to reserves in light of extenuating financial circumstances. We expect very few applicants (relative to the total number applying) to meet the criteria for assistance, so the financial burden of waiving these fees should be minimal.

2. Staggered Fees. Instead of paying the entire fee upon acceptance of the applications, applicants meeting the criteria established for support could pay the fees incrementally (perhaps following the refund schedule in reverse). Allowing an applicant to have a staggered fee payment schedule gives the applicant more time to raise money, and investors will be more likely to back an application that passes the initial evaluation. If the applicant does not proceed through the entire process, they are not "costing" ICANN the full projected amount, therefore cost recovery remains intact.

3. Auction Proceeds. Qualified applicants receive a partial refund from any auction proceeds (3 ) —for which they can repay any loans or invest into their registry, or the auction proceeds could be used to refill a disadvantaged applicant’s foundation fund.

4. Lower the Registry fixed fees due to ICANN. In lieu of the Registry-Level fixed fee of US$25,000 per calendar year (4 ), instead only charge the Registry-Level Transaction Fee of US$0.25 per initial or renewal domain name registration. An annual fee of US$25k to ICANN is a barrier to sustainability for an applicant representing a small community. Many TLDs pay much less to ICANN (if anything). If a minimum is absolutely required, then consider lowering this fee by 50% for qualified applicants.

5. Reconsider the Risk/Contingency cost per applicant (US$60k). The WT questions if ICANN really expects a total of US$30,000,000 (US$60k x 500 applications) in unknown or variable costs to surface. This fee could be reduced/excused for the applicants that meet the criteria established by the WG.

6. The Fixed/Variable cost of US$100,000 is based on the total cost of the previous round of applications, which the cost considerations document quantifies as US$1.8MM for all ten applications. This fee possibly includes costs associated with the conflict that arose from the rejection of the ".XXX" application, which remains unresolved. The fee of US$180,000 may have been significantly skewed by the long-term work required for .XXX. The actual evaluation and administrative costs for the other nine applications may have been considerably less than US$180,000 per piece. If this is the case, the US$100,000 fixed cost fee could be reduced for the applicants that meet the criteria established by the WG.

WT1 is working with WT2 on identifying sources of funding for subsidizing the fees for qualified applicants. The WG suggests that an independent foundation be established, outside of ICANN structures, to assist applicants with funding.

 

Working Team 2

The who and what of offering assistance: Working Team 2 findings

 

1. Who should receive support?

Key to making a support program work is the choice of initial support recipients. With this in mind Working Team 2 considered a number of possible applicants, but agreed that the initial focus should be on finding a relatively limited and easily identifiable set of potential applicants which would be non-controversial to support. Based on these criteria, the Working Team recommended the following:

a.  At least in the initial/pilot phase, target support to ethnic and linguistic communities (e.g. the Hausa community, Quechua speakers, Tamil speakers). These potential applicants have the benefits of being relatively well defined as groups, and pass the test of being generally non-controversial. Such communities already have a history of recognition at ICANN and facilitating community on the web is one of ICANN’s core values.

b.  Address support for other groups, especially NGOs and civil society organizations at a future point as the idea of who constitutes a “community” in this space is less clear and the tests for which groups might need/merit support would be trickier. Moreover, the number of applicants could be very large.

c.  Overall, the Working Team recommended giving some preference to applicants geographically located in Emerging Markets/Developing countries and in languages whose presence on the web is limited.

d.  A series of groups are not recommended for support at this time, specifically:

• Applicants that don’t need the support/have ample financing

• Applicants that are brands/groups that should be self-supporting companies

• Purely Government/parastatal applicants (though applicants with some Government support might be eligible)

• Applicants whose business model doesn’t demonstrate sustainability

 

2. What kinds of support might be offered?

The group recommended a number of different kinds of support that could be valuable for potential applicants, support which falls relatively neatly into three categories:

 

a. Logistical, outreach and fee Support in the Application Process

• Translation of relevant documents – a major concern noted by non-English speaking group members, who noted the extra time and effort needed to work in English

• Logistical and technical help with the application process – including legal and filing support that are expensive and in short supply in most Emerging Markets nations

• Awareness/outreach efforts – to make more people in underserved markets are aware of the gTLD process and what they can do to participate in the gTLD process

• Fee reduction/subsidization and/or some sort of phased-in payment for deserving applicants – this discussion builds off of the work of Working Team 1, and includes two key ideas: o That deserving applicants might receive some reduced pricing in general

That some sort of phasing for payment might be appropriate, enabling selected applicants to effectively “pay as they go” for the application process rather than having all funds assembled up front

 

b. Technical Support for Applicants in operating or qualifying to operate a gTLD

Infrastructure – providing IPv6 compatible hardware and networks as needed

Education/consulting – to help with DNSSEC implementation

Possible technical waivers or “step ups” – allowing applicants to build their capabilities rather than needing to demonstrate full capacity before applying (as appropriate)

Lower cost and/or shared back end registry services

 

c. Support for Build-out in Underserved Languages and IDNs for new gTLDs

Price discounts to incentivize build-out in scripts with a limited presence on the web

Bundled pricing to promote build out in multiple scripts – incentivizing an expansion of IDN content as new gTLDs are launched by encouraging applicants to build out in numerous scripts at once

Clear tests to prevent gaming and ensure that support reaches its targets

 

3. Other recommendations?

The Working Team also discussed a series of “principles” that are recommended to guide the community as the support process is finalized, namely:

a. Self-Financing responsibility – ICANN/community support should comprise not significantly more than 50% of the total cost of an application. The WG saw this as a good way to encourage accountability and sustainability.

b. Sunset period – Support should have an agreed cut-off/sunset point, perhaps 5 years, after which no further support would be offered. This was recommended as another measure to promote sustainability and as a way to help limited resources reach more applicants.

c. Transparency – Support requests and levels should be made public to encourage transparency.

d. Applicant form is not limited – While many groups receiving support would be NGOs, applicants would not need to be non-profits. Some might start as non-profits but morph into hybrids or for-profits and others might be appropriate for-profit or hybrid applicants.

e. Limited Government support – The receipt of some support from government(s) should not disqualify a community applicant from receiving gTLD support. However, the process is not designed to subsidize government-led initiatives.

f. Repayment in success cases – In cases where supported gTLDs make money significantly above and beyond the level support received through this process, recipients would agree to re-pay/rebate application subsidies into a revolving fund to support future applications.

 

Additional Questions and Possible Responses:

• Q: Can we offer standardized plans of support? A: This will become clear over time, but standardizing packages of support should help reduce support costs.

• Q: Is there a minimum number of people in a community needed to create “critical mass” for viability? A: There was extensive discussion around this, but no consensus. It is hoped that new business models will emerge specifically for work with smaller communities.

 

Notes

1. http://www.icann.org/en/topics/new-gtlds/cost-considerations-04oct09-en.pdf

2. http://www.icann.org/en/topics/new-gtlds/new-gtld-budget-28may10-en.pdf

3. http://www.icann.org/en/topics/new-gtlds/Draft-rfp-clean-28may10-en.pdf page 4-18

4. Draft-rfp-clean-28may10-en.pdf Registry Agreement 6.1

 

Chartered Objectives for the Working Group

(as adopted by the GNSO Council and ALAC) :

Preamble: The Joint SO/AC Working Group on New gTLD Applicant Support shall evaluate and propose recommendations regarding specific support to new gTLD applicants in justified cases. The working group expects to identify suitable criteria for provision of such support, to identify suitable support forms and to identify potential providers of such support. However, there is no presumption that the outcome will imply any particular governing structure. Accordingly, if the recommendations indicate that the preferred solutions are of a voluntary nature, the criteria and other provisions arrived at in line with the objectives below will solely serve as advice to the parties concerned. The objectives are not listed in any priority order. An overall consideration is that the outcomes of the WG should not lead to delays of the New gTLD process.

Objective 1: To identify suitable criteria that new gTLD applicants must fulfill to qualify for dedicated support. The criteria may be different for different types of support identified in line with Objective 2 and 3 below.

Objective 2: To identify how the application fee can be reduced and/or subsidized to accommodate applicants that fulfill appropriate criteria to qualify for this benefit, in keeping with the principle of full cost recovery of the application process costs.

  Objective 3: To identify what kinds of support (e.g. technical assistance, organizational assistance, financial assistance, fee reduction) and support timelines (e.g. support for the application period only, continuous support) are appropriate for new gTLD applicants fulfilling identified criteria.

Objective 4: To identify potential providers of the identified kinds of support as well as appropriate mechanisms to enable support provisioning.

Objective 5: To identify conditions and mechanisms required to minimize the risk of inappropriate access to support. Agreed within WG, pending GNSO Council and ALAC adoption) Operating procedures for the Working Group The Working Group will operate according to the interim working group guidelines set out in the Draft Working guidelines of 5 Feb 2010.


4. Transcript – Brussels Meeting Workshop Sessio n

Intro

The WG organized a workshop o n June 23, during the ICANN Brussels meeting entitled Reducing Barriers to New gTLD Creation in Developing Regions” . The details of the session can be found here: http://brussels38.icann.org/node/12503 . Below is the excerpt of transcript from the audience at Brussels Workshop.

_________________________________________________________________________________

ICANN Brussels/Reducing Barriers to New gTLD Creation in Developing Regions Wednesday, 23 June 2010 questions and comments from the audience.

>>KARLA VALENTE:  So the first question comes from Danny Younger. Director Touray, I am aware of a Registry operator that handles a limited amount of registrations that does not charge any fee for

registrations and that uses no registrar services.  Their organization's contract is up for rebid next year, and we all know that the prospect of competition often inspires new innovative solutions.

This registry operator, Diana, can provide such registry services for IGOs by the way for INT.  Is there any particular reason why it couldn't be cajoled into providing equivalent registry services for NGOs in the developing world, perhaps a similar dot NGO TLD?

>>KATIM TOURAY:   Good afternoon, everyone.  And thanks very much, Evan, for that, your very kind, and I daresay overblown presentation. I don't think it's quite accurate to say that I was responsible for the resolution that resulted, in effect, in this Joint Working Group. I'd like to see it as everything that ICANN does as a joint effort that really saw the involvement of each and every one of us. And it's for this reason that I promised Avri and also Olof that I was going to try to do my best to come and join you here, even if briefly. We have an ongoing board workshop right now, but I had to pull myself out of that, because it's important, I think, to come and be with you and express my gratitude to you for the wonderful job, especially the Joint Working Group has been doing. The work that you're doing is very important.  As I was telling the African group yesterday, it must also be seen in the context of the fact that it's work that you are doing not only for your own benefit and the benefit of developing world, but also for the benefit of ICANN itself.

You will recall that the board resolution that we passed, board resolution number 20 in Nairobi, specifically mentioned that to do this would be very much in service of ICANN's objectives of being an inclusive organization. So to the extent that you are helping move the objectives of the

resolution forward, you are also helping ICANN achieve its objectives. I really want to thank you again very -- thank you again for the wonderful work that you're doing, that you have been doing, and also encourage you to get as much information as is possible, as many perspectives as is possible.  Because as I always keep saying, none of us is as smart or smarter than all of us.  And so that's why it's particularly important that we move this multistakeholder approach, the grass roots-driven approach by ensuring that we have as much input into these deliberations as is possible.

We certainly are looking forward to the recommendations that are going to emanate from the wonderful work that you are doing, and hopefully we'll come away with something that's going to be to the mutual satisfaction of all of us.

Again, thank you very much.  I'm sorry I came in late, and I'm especially sorry that I have to leave to go and join the board back again in our workshop. Again, thanks very much and all the best wishes of success in your deliberations. Thanks.

>> Okay.  Thank you.  I hope it's the right place to pose a question. (inaudible) what will happen long term IDN language-wise competition. One has the domain name burnout.com.  Now will come maybe a domain name in Swahili, burnout.africa.  Both are TLDs.  They will be translated by search engines.  So in three years' time, what name will win the page ranking competition internationally?

And I already experienced that my Farsi name for caviar is being translated in --

>>EVAN LEIBOVITCH:   I'm sorry.  I hate -- I hate to cut you off, but I really don't think that's relevant to what -- we're talking here about cost reduction.

>>EVAN LEIBOVITCH:   Okay.  Good question.  Wrong place.  Sorry.

>>STEVE DELBIANCO:   Steve Delbianco for Net Choice Coalition. Carlos, you said your focus on who was all about people.  I feel as if talking about just applicants as people, you missed the fact that 56% of the people on the planet don't use the Latin script as their primary language.  And until this year, they've had zero capability to do a URL, domain name, or e-mail address.  So I have a question, if the who is the people, we aren't really serving them today with anything but a couple of IDN ccTLDs.  And what I'm hearing this week, it would be one or two years before the gTLD IDNs can serve these people.  So I saw a little bit of a clash, if the who we're serving are the people, it may be necessary to give incentives to companies to launch their gTLDs in versions of other languages that are IDNs or they're just not going to do it.  They're not going to spend 2- to $400,000 to serve those people.  So how does that clash between the first group that said we wouldn't serve, say, a commercial applicant, even though we know they're serving the people that need it most?

>>KARLA VALENTE:   The question comes from Mary and's a segue from what Elaine just said.

Just to be clear, the basis or assumption is that support is only for community-based TLD applicants, and the question was based on the slide that says first round only for ethnic and linguistic

communities.  We clarified on the chat room that the support is not limited to communities only.  That was just the way that the slide was written. So the other question from Mary is, to the extent that the first-round recommendations are more likely to and more clearly be candidates from

community-based applicants, I wonder if the group considered the requirements and dispute resolution sections of the Draft Applicant Guidebook Version 4 as within its mandate.  For example, fair, attainable by likely candidates.

>>CHUCK GOMES:   My name is Chuck Gomes.  I have a question with regard to the bundling idea with regard to underserved language communities.

New gTLD applicants as well as even existing registries who want to offer IDN gTLDs are not in need of special support with regard to financial support or like that, but they would be very unlikely to be

able to justify, from a business point of view, offering their versions of their IDN TLDs and pay 185,000 fee, et cetera, to underserved language community. Is it the intent or even consideration, I know they are not definite recommendations yet, of the working group to include that kind of

bundling opportunity in your recommendation?

>>ROBERT HUTCHINSON:   I am Bob Hutchinson from Dynamic Ventures.  We specialize in helping entrepreneurs start new businesses.  And I was wondering if you considered the lively idea of bundling.  I think it makes a lot of sense.  I wonder if you looked at micro-capital kinds of ways of funding the beginnings of these bundled businesses and so on and so forth.  I'm curious if you did that.

>>KARLA VALENTE:   Hi, this is Karla on behalf of our remote participants.  So you know we have around 28 remote participants throughout this session. This question comes from John McCormick.  Will local ccTLD's impact be part of the evaluation process for community linguistic gTLD proposals?  Basically the commercial impact of a community language gTLD on a local ccTLD where most of the community language group is based.

>> Hi, my name is Xing Hsao (phonetic).  I work for DotAsia registry, but speaking on my own behalf.  Two questions.  First is I would like to know how confidence is the group right now, for example, in the next six months to incorporate the ideas into the real implementation plan of the new gTLD program.  Speaking of which is that, for example, I'm understanding the mission of cost cutdown for the applicant fee, but there's still fees involved in additional cost.  For example, like registry evaluation or even in the question of that 50 questions, there will be requirement of a three-year -- I mean, their financial deposit for the operation. So that's one. And actually the second is noticing that there's some exemptions of the brands from the developing country may not be eligible for that. I would like to take from a different perspective is that perhaps the groups can also think about to help the brand owners in the developing countries, like China, India, or Brazil, to make sure that they are aware of the program, so their brands in the new gTLD rounds can be more involved and be aware of what's happening in the trademark clearinghouse area and so on and so forth.

>>NII QUAYNOR:   Yes, my name is Nii Quaynor.  I come from Ghana.com. I am a registrar but I am speaking for myself. I want to be clear that we are doing this for a better Internet, and I want to ask publicly whether you do have a particular operate in mind as you define the applicant support system.  And specifically to Alex, you mentioned a dot Africa operator.  Does it exist? Thank you.

>>NARESH AJWANI:  My name is Naresh Ajwani.  I am a president of Cyber Caf Association of India.  We are an ecosystem of 180,000 cyber cafss, 70 ISPs, 49 government application, and 70 million Internet users. I have a question.  I am sure the cost for the entry fee is very a thought throughout approach of ICANN.  So when we are talking about the cost reduction, from where this cost would be recovered is my question, is my query?

>>NARESH AJWANI:  Shortly, it does.  But yes, I have a comment to make.  It is a cross-subsidy.  There are no free lunches. I think if a business model can be considered based on revenue share,

this particular challenge can be addressed.  Entry fees in all these developing countries are now getting replaced by revenue share model. For example, if a hundred dollars come into an organization, then a percent from the gross revenue is taken by the licenser, government, or anybody like ICANN. So I'm sure that particular piece might have been considered by you to

not bring a cross-subsidy or a feeling of cutting the cost.  Revenue share is only suggestion I think I can make at this juncture. Thank you.

>>NARESH NAJWARI:  Suggestion would be kindly consider different provision also that will really make not somebody to feel that he is being benefited in different business model.

You have referred about India.  I must tell you, a few years back, the biggest company in shampoo, P&G, was going back thinking shampoo can't be sold in India.  So they changed the business model and they brought sachets, small pouches.  Today every house, nook and corner of India has got shampoo from P&G.  It's all about changing business models instead of doing any cross-subsidy, reducing the cost.  If that particular aspect can be considered, I am very confident it will be accepted much faster. Thank you.


5. Cover Letter and Text of Second Snapshot Taken on 

    18 September 2010

 

To: The ICANN Board and the Chartering Organizations: ALAC and the GNSO Council

From: Co-chairs of the Joint SO/AC Working Group on New gTLD Applicant Support

 

The Working Group has made a great deal of progress since the Brussels meeting and is well along in the process of finding the consensus point on the recommendations.  The group has put a great deal of time into analyzing the community comments and into reviewing the initial recommendations as defined in the first snapshot in the light of those comments.  While we near the end of this process, we have not yet completed the work.

 

The enclosed document is an excerpt from the final output document of the WG covering the WG recommendations.  For the most part, the items in this document have consensus.  In the few cases where there is still an ongoing debate, the options are listed either in [bracketed text1, bracketed text2], or in one case in an expanded section listing 2 options.

 

We hope that this second snapshot will be useful to the ICANN Board in their discussions on the New gTLD Program.  We would appreciate any feedback either the ICANN Board or the chartering organizations might have on our discussions.  It has been a goal of this group to make sure we were able to present recommendations in time for the upcoming round of new gTLD applications. The participants in this group believe that being able to provide assistance now and not at some possible future round is critical for various reasons. These reasons include:

 

- Board resolution 2010.03.12.46-47 was quite clear on the need to ensure that the current New gTLD Program should be inclusive.  Much of the ICANN community took hope from this decision and not to deliver on this first round would disappoint the global community greatly.

 

- With every round, the competitive disadvantage for the new gTLDs increases.  For ICANN to cause further disadvantage to those who already are at a disadvantage due to its pricing considerations could be seen as an abrogation of its responsibly to serve the global public interest and foster competition for all.

 

- The pent up demand for new gTLDs, especially IDN gTLD, is so great that there is an expectation for many applications.  There is a concern that without some sort of assistance program, all of the most obvious names, including IDNs, will be grabbed by wealthy investors, leaving little opportunity, especially in developing regions, for local community institutions and developing country entrepreneurs.

 

- While there is every plan for a second round, and most of us believe that such a round will occur, its timetable is at best uncertain.  The round of 2001 was supposed to be followed by new rounds, and though it now appears that it will be, it took a decade for that to happen.  Since it is impossible to give guarantees of when there might be a future round, making those who cannot afford the current elevated ICANN prices wait for an uncertain future is not seen as equitable treatment.

 

In the final document, we will not only present the recommendations of the WG, but will explain those recommendations and will list the activities that we are recommending as follow on work. 

 

Finally, we apologize for the delay in delivering this by the document deadline and hope that you will receive and consider this brief document nonetheless.

 

Thank you,

 

Avri Doria and Evan Leibovitch

Co-chairs, Joint SO/AC Working Group on New gTLD Applicant Support


  1. Excerpt from Draft Final
    [2] Report -­ New gTLD Applicant

Support (JAS WG)

 

The WG decided that the initial focus should be on finding a relatively limited and identifiable set of potential applicants that would be not controversial to support. Unless otherwise indicated, the WG reached consensus on the following recommendations.

Recommendations on cost reductions

The WG recommends that the following fee reductions be made available to all applicants who are determined as meeting the need criteria established for financial support:

  • Waive the cost of Program Development (US$26,000);
  • Payment of the fees incrementally (perhaps following the refund schedule in reverse);
  • Eliminate contingency fee of $60,000;
  • Decrement the $100,000 fee so as not to make new gTLD applicants who meet the need criteria pay fee based on the expenses of the previous round.  Without a full analysis of what went into calculating these cost it is difficult to estimate what percentage of these fees should be eliminated for qualifying applicants.

 

Further, the WG recommends that all applicants who are determined as meeting the need criteria established for financial support receive the following consideration:

  • Qualified applicants receive a partial refund from any auction proceeds, should any become available;
  • Lower the Registry fixed fees due to ICANN.  In lieu of the Registry-Level fixed fee of US$25,000 per calendar year, only charge the Registry-Level Transaction Fee per initial or renewal domain name registration.

Recommendations regarding Sponsorship/ Fundraising

The group discussed the possibility of financial assistance for applicants.  This was seen as coming from two types of sources:

  • Distributed by an ICANN originated fund - It was uncertain what sort of funding might be arranged through ICANN, especially for this first round, though the group recommends that a fundraising effort be established.  For any funding provided through ICANN by a benefactor that does not wish to administer that funding itself, these funds would be allocated by a specially dedicated committee, only to those who meet the need conditions established for the program.
  • From external funding agencies - External funding agencies would make grants according to their own requirements and goals. ICANN would only provide applicant information to external funding agencies that met need conditions established by the program.

 

TLD applicants would be free to approach external funding agencies on their own initiative without affecting their applications for financial or other assistance under this program.

  • The WG recommends that ICANN begin a search for a development director with an initial goal of securing commitments for $10,000,000 for an ICANN based development fund;
  • There was some support in the WG for recommending that ICANN put in place the means for existing registrants to voluntarily contribute to the development program through registrar-to-registry contribution pass-through, and enable non-registrant small donors to contribute to the development program, and concurrent with the execution of the development message to the donor communities, that the development message also be delivered to the registrant, and non-registrant user communities through earned and paid media;
  • The WG recommend working with well know development funding agencies to set up funding programs for gTLD for less developed region applicants who meet the needs based criteria.

Recommendations regarding non-cost considerations

The members of the working group recommended that a program be initiated to enable the following types of aid to be provided to all applicants, especially those meeting the need conditions:

  • Logistical support in the application process;
  • Technical support for applicants in operating or qualifying to operate a gTLD.

Which applicants would be entitled to special support

The primary criterion for eligibility is financial need . The definition of financial need and the method for determining the needs of an application has not been established by the WG at this time. Among the types of applicant that are to be included in support, once financial or other need has been established are:

  • Community-based applications such as cultural, linguistic and ethnic;
  • Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs), civil society and not-for-profit organizations;
  • Applicants geographically located in emerging markets/developing countries;
  • Applications in languages whose presence on the web is limited;
  • Entrepreneurs wanting to serve a developing market that might not be sustainable under the current cost structure.

NOT recommended for support, even if they can demonstrate financial need, are the following types of application:

  • Geographic names;
  • Purely Government/para-state applicants (though applicants with some Government support might be eligible);
  • Applicants whose business model does not demonstrate sustainability.

Defined Constraints on aid

  • On financial aid, no more that 50% of the financial aid for the reduced fee can be provided by an ICANN organized development fund.  This is not meant to limit the manner in which fund raising for the other 50% is done and can include grant and aid from non ICANN related sources.
  • Support should have an agreed cut-off/sunset point, e.g 5 years, after which no further support would be offered.
  • Support requests and levels should be made public to encourage transparency.
  • The receipt of some support from government(s) should not disqualify a applicant from receiving gTLD support. However, the process is not designed to subsidize government-led initiatives.
  • In cases where supported gTLDs make revenue significantly above and beyond costs, recipients would agree to re-pay/rebate application subsidies into a revolving fund to support future applications.

Relationship to the Application Guide

These recommendations should not affect the content of the Application Guide.  Rather it is a separate program that needs to be established in parallel with the completion of the Application Guide Book.

Support for Bundling

Note:  There is an ongoing discussion within the Working Group as to whether this is in scope with the charter of the group.  As that discussion has not yet been finalized, the issue is included here for information purposes.

 

There has been consensus to apply the following program to applicants that meet the criteria in 3.4. There is support, but no consensus to apply this program to all applicants. Based on recommendations within the group and from the comments there was no consensus but two proposals for bundling to support minority language applicants. The two proposals for bundling are discussed below.

 

Option A

In the case of applicants who are applying for one IDN gTLD, [a second IDN gTLD, further IDN gTLDs] would receive a discount application fee (from the full price for those who don't qualify for the need based criteria or the reduced price from those who do qualify for need based reduction) on sliding discount scale based on the number of native users of the script.

 

Option B

For the purposes of application fee calculation, the two or more strings shall be considered as a single application.

 

The WG advises applicants that there is, at present, no mechanism to completely and transparently deliver single administrative costs over two or more namespaces through CNAME, DNAME, or other means, and that service delivery to multiple namespaces is likely to have higher administrative costs than service delivery to a single namespace.

 

The WG advises that the intent of the WG is not to replace or create an alternative to any policy generally available for "variant characters" within a single script.


[2] The Final Report  referenced here is actually the Milestone Report. The document received a new title prior to publication.